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Success Rates

Clinics may present their results in different ways, which can sometimes by confusing. When looking at success rates for a clinic, it is very important that you look at the figures carefully and ensure that you look at those most relevant to your personal circumstances.   Follow the link for HFEA advice on success rates http://www.hfea.gov.uk/fertility-clinics-success-rates.html. Information contained on the HFEA website is a national source of information.

Clinical Pregnancy Rates

Latest  HFEA Verified Results  2014/15

Clinical Pregnancy Rate Per cycle started (%)

 

Under 35 y

35-37 y

38-39 y

40-42 y

 43+ y

 

 

 

 

 

 

IVF

40.0

(32/80)

44.7

(17/38)

 7.7

(1/13)

38.5

(5/13)

0

(0/4)

ICSI

40.6

(39/96)

30.8

(4/13)

30.8

(4/13)

33.3

(2/6)

100

(1/1)

IVF & ICSI

40.3

(71/176)

41.2

(21/51)

19.2

(5/26)

36.8

(7/19)

20

(1/5)

Frozen Embryo Transfer

 

24.2

(15/62)

18.8

(6/32)

0

(0/18)

 25.0

(3/12)

 0

(0/3)


Live Birth Rates

 

Latest  HFEA Verified Results  2013/14

Clinical Pregnancy Rate Per cycle started (%)

 

Under 35 y

35-37 y

38-39 y

40-42 y

 43+ y

 

 

 

 

 

 

IVF

31.8

(21/66)

8.3

(2/24)

 4.76

(1/21)

0

(0/6)

0

(0/3)

ICSI

31.6

(30/95)

35.71

(5/14)

17.6

(3/17)

0

(0/6)

0

(0/1)

IVF & ICSI

31.7

(51/161)

18.42

(7/38)

10.52

(4/38)

 

0

(0/12)

0

(0/4)

Frozen Embryo Transfer

 

26.1

(18/69)

24

(6/25)

15.38

(2/13)

 9.09

(1/11)

 0

(0/5)


Our Latest Success Rates 2017

On average, in May 2017

  • 60% of IVF patients had a clinical pregnancy*
  • 33.3% of ICSI patients had a clinical pregnancy*
  • 30.0% of patients having a Frozen Embryo Transfer had a clinical pregnancy*

* As this is recent data, it has not yet been verified by the HFEA

Multiple Births

Multiple pregnancies are the single biggest risk of fertility treatment to the health and the welfare of both mother and child. Multiple pregnancies carry higher risk of preterm (premature) labour, miscarriage and low birth weight. Therefore the birth of a single, healthy child is the safest, most desirable outcome of fertility treatment.

In our clinic, we encourage all good prognosis couples to have to just one embryo transferred to reduce the probability of multiple pregnancies.

The HFEA has set a target for all clinics in UK to limit the risk of multiple births to less than 15% in the year 2011/2012. Centres are currently working towards a 10% multiple birth rate.

 

Proportion of single live births for this clinic (July 2013-end June 2014 data)

91.1%

HFEA Target for single births (October 2012 onwards)

90%

 

Leicester embryologist named UK top performer by national body for second year running

For the second year running Leicester Hospitals’ Embryologist, Amy Sharpe has been named as the Top Performer in Embryology by the UK National External Quality Assurance Scheme (UK NEQAS).

Since 1969, UK NEQAS has been providing a comprehensive world-wide service that enables laboratories to fulfil quality goals and facilitate optimal patient care. The scheme is designed to assess scientists who perform gamete (a cell that fuses with another cell during conception) and embryo assessment to ensure they are performing adequately.

At the Leicester Fertility Centre, embryo assessment is used as the main tool for selecting which embryo(s) are best to be transferred back into the patient and also which are suitable for cryopreservation (freezing).

Amy explains: “It is important to select the best embryo for transfer as this improves the chances of the couple conceiving. My results for the NEQAS scheme over the last 12 months have again shown me to be the top performer at embryo assessment in the UK, Israel and Finland.”

Amy joined Leicester Hospitals in 2003 as a trainee embryologist and continued her employment after qualifying. Amy’s role as a clinical embryologist includes all aspects of gamete and embryo assessment and micro-manipulation to help infertile couples to conceive.

She adds: “I’m delighted to have achieved this recognition from the NEQAS Reproductive Science Scheme for a second year and will continue assess embryos to the best of my ability to benefit our patients.”