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Becoming a sperm donor

Why are sperm donors required?

There are a number of reasons why donated sperm is required by infertile couples:

  • There may be no sperm present in the ejaculate of the male partner – either due to blockage, vasectomy, testicular failure or sterility following chemotherapy
  • The male partner may not be able to ejaculate normally
  • The male partner’s sperm may be of such poor quality that it is not able to fertilise his partner’s eggs
  • The male partner may be at risk of passing on an inherited disease or may have an unusual genetic make-up which could put any of his children at risk
  • Donor sperm may also be used to treat single women and same sex couples.

Sperm donors are nationally in short supply and many couples are on waiting lists to receive donor sperm.

     

What would determine my suitability to be a sperm donor?

  • Donors must be between the ages of 18 and 40 and should have no serious medical disability or family history of hereditary disorders. Before being accepted as a donor you would need to attend the Clinic for an interview and complete a detailed questionnaire about your own and your family's medical history.
     
  • You would be required to produce a semen sample, which would be analysed in order to assess the quantity and quality of your sperm. Potential donors must be aware that their sperm sample could fail to fulfil the requirements for donation. Should this be the case, the appropriate member of the Clinic’s medical team will be available to discuss the implications if required. In all cases, the embryologist is able to discuss the result even if the parameters are normal.
     

I'd like to donate, what do I do next?

Firstly, thank you for considering becoming a sperm donor with us!

Please read through the information booklet on this page. If you have any questions or would like an appointment to see if you are elegiable to become a donor with us please call: 0116 258 5944 and ask to speak to our sperm donor co-ordinator or email amy.sharpe@uhl-tr.nhs.uk